The rise and fall of the Taliban

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The Taliban is a quasi-government paramilitary force that rose out of the aftermath of the Russian-Afghan War in the early 1990s. Depending on who one may ask, their origins are somewhat debatable, but for the sake of this explanation, the rise of the Taliban will be considered in the historical context of the political atmosphere that resulted from U.S./Russian tensions stemming from the Cold War; a particularly Orientalist perspective, but a notable origin nonetheless. 

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The resergance of Islam as a political force

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Today, the “Clash of Civilizations” would more accurately be written as the clash of “fundamentalisms.” Religion plays a vital role for both the West and Arab states, predominantly as an infinitely opaque veil which disguises the true political root cause of the perceived “clash” between the West and Islam. 

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Too Big to Fail: How 9/11, the housing crisis, and the world bank led to a global revolution

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My generation has been largely deceived. We let the power of the few take control, out of irrational fear, following the post 9/11, war on terror, world. Because of our own choices, the Wall Street elite were able to take advantage of the people of the world, and now hold most of the money in the United States, at the expense of the rest. Of course, this elaborate crime against the American people, as well as the people of the world, could not have been so brilliantly executed without the help and support of the United States government, and few other central characters. The Occupy Wall Street movement of 2011 is the culmination of the anger my generation feels towards the thievery that has been pinned upon us. Although the movements are greatly misinterpreted, and criticized by all sides of the political spectrum, they continue to grow, and in the future, may become the defining achievement of my generation. To quote one anonymous picket sign: “now is when we take the power back”.

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Home.

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Stand at the end of Fourteenth Street in West Oakland. This neighborhood has seen the worst of Bay Area gentrification, and its reflection is in the glass that covers the sidewalks, flowing down into gutters, stretching into the distance. It sticks to the walls of buildings and the fronts of homes, where everything as tall as the average person is covered with decades of graffiti frescoes.

A leather recliner, like the one your grandfather used to sit in, is now tipped over on to the asphalt, lacerated from end to end, hemorrhaging foam into the storm drain.

There are no people here. There are signs of their presence, though there are merely only clues as to where they may have gone, yet the only sound is the static of the constant humming vibration of traffic from the overpass overhead.

Track homes are huddled, wall-to-wall, all the way down the street, only broken by a chain link fence surrounding a dirt lot where one of those houses burned to ground so many years ago.

But this lot is not vacant.

Tucked behind the trees lies a treasure. Shrouded in shrubbery sits a shack, only slightly smaller than a garden shed, fitted with a loft, a fire burning stove, a desk and an old grand piano.

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Adjunct professors struggle with low pay, no job security

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Sheila Tully, SF State’s California Faculty Association chapter president, poses in her office in HSS 331 at SF State Tuesday, March 18. Photo by Rachel Aston / Xpress

Article by Jennie Butler

Anthropology Lecturer Sheila Tully took what is known as the “academic path.” She obtained bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees in areas of study that inspired her, and took a part-time teaching position at SF State.

Tully thought that if she worked hard she could live comfortably in San Francisco, and she did for 28 years on an income never exceeding $40,000 annually – until two years ago when the rent-controlled building she lived in with her family was sold.

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There is no where to place blame in the shooting of Stephen Guillermo

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Like all students, Stephen Guillermo wanted a break from studying before finals week, where he could just focus on having fun.

After a night of drinking with his friends, he walked into his apartment complex, but onto the wrong floor. Then he walked into the home of Amisi Sudi Kapecha, who saw Guillermo as an intruder and fired the shot that abruptly ended his life.

As journalists, Stephen’s tragic death took different tolls on all of us. At times, he was a story; at times he was a number.

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The right to bear arms is essential to our lasting freedom

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Welcome to the United States, home of beer, cheeseburgers, free speech and lots of guns. We also have an entire system of laws that protects our right to enjoy all four of these things.

Our founding fathers believed that a citizen’s right to bear arms was important enough to be in our constitution. According to this document, we have an equal right to own a dog, a car or a gun; all of which can kill if not treated responsibly.

While guns may be a source of fun for some and personal safety for others, they have another role for citizens. According to our forefathers, they defend against tyranny.

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